Smoked Bacon Wrapped Pork Steaks

Pork steaks, the 1″ or so slices of a Boston Butt (pork shoulder), are a St. Louis institution. A “true” St. Louisan would cook the hell out of them over direct heat and then chuck them into a bath of Maull’s BBQ sauce and Budweiser to simmer for a while. When I say direct heat, I mean a generous pile of charcoal lit by lighter fluid until the grill surface exceeds 500 degrees, only to be cooled by spritzing Bud Light onto the flames. Serve with corn on the cob, vinegary slaw, and gooey butter cake.

It’s one of those tastes / mouthfeels that pulls you to a time and place in your past. Oppressive August heat and humidity, standing on a zoysia grass lawn in swim trunks while a sprinkler mists you and your siblings and neighbors. Your feet are covered in grass clippings and mud from your trip down the Slip n Slide, half of the spraying nozzles shooting in weird directions. Beer cans still had pull tabs. An ice cream truck is audible but not visible, having stopped off at some other family’s summer BBQ. Your uncle has opinions about unions and urban crime that he only shares once he’s full of light beer. An overloaded wax paper plate barely contains all that food, a swirl of sauce and slaw dressing drips on to a card table with a ripped yellow foam and plastic pleather top. Patterned too-thin napkins do a poor job of cleaning the sauce off your face. The meat is dried out and over tender, but the Mets are pond scum, and dammit it’s tasty. Sip on some orange Vess soda.This is an STL summer BBQ in the late 80s.

Just a few weeks ago at the Webster Groves carnival, I re-sampled the traditional STL pork steak. While nostalgic, it’s an experience best left in the past.

Only the finest pork steaks from Schnucks

Only the finest pork steaks from Schnucks

A couple pork steaks were well-dusted with Lawry’s Seasoned Salt, given a nice sprinkling of dried sage, and conservatively added a few shakes of Slap Ya Mama, a spicy seasoning souvenir from my trip to Florida last year.

Since bacon-wrapping whole pork steaks might be tricky, given their size and shape, I elected to cut them in half before wrapping.

Halved, seasoned pork steaks

Halved, seasoned pork steaks

I experimented both with and without water-soaked bamboo skewers. It turns out that they were unnecessary.

Probably a little more skewer than necessary

Probably a little more skewer than necessary

In a Weber 22″, I set up for indirect smoking with a 1/2 chimney of Kingsford charcoal and apple wood chunks. The lid should be oriented so that the vent is open and over the meat, so the smoke and heat must be drawn past the pork as it leaves the grill. This ensures lots of smoke flavor and even cooking.

Grill set up, ready for smoke

Grill set up, ready for smoke

After about 30 minutes, I checked on the pork steaks and flipped them.

Wonderful color, great smoke texture on the bacon

Wonderful color, great smoke texture on the bacon

I love how bacon will curl and harden after smoking. The temptation to pull of those crispy curls is strong.

Close up of porky goodness

Close up of porky goodness

Once flipped, I left them alone for a little more smoke and tossed a couple more wood chunks on the coals.

The underside of the half-completed pork steaks

The underside of the half-completed pork steaks

Grill-marked smoked bacon

Grill-marked smoked bacon

After another 15-20 minutes, I pulled the meat and let it rest for about 5-10 minutes. I’d hate to cut into one of these and have all the juices spill out.

Finished product

Finished product

Cross section of bacon wrapped pork steaks

Cross section of bacon wrapped pork steaks

For once I managed to get some great color on bacon-wrapped meat. It’s been a struggle in the past, but these pork steaks possessed a wonderful pink ring along the outside.

Close up bite with smoke ring detail

Close up bite with smoke ring detail

Tender, juicy… lots of pork flavors and crispy bacon texture. These are not your classic St. Louis pork steaks. No Maull’s, no beer bath, no shredding over tender dried out pork.

I repeated this on a larger scale on a UDS a week later.

Love my country house UDS

Love my country house UDS

These came out just as well as the trial versions I made at home.

Hungry family members were pleased

Hungry family members were pleased

Classic childhood food experiences have a place. In the case of bad pork steaks, that place is firmly in the past. Slow smoking pork steaks is the way to go.

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Brewery Review: Tin Mill Brewery (Hermann, MO)

Happy ten year wedding anniversary to my wonderful wife! During our recent celebratory (kid-free!) weekend to winery-rich and historic Hermann, Missouri, we made a stop at the Tin Mill Brewery, just south of the Missouri River in the middle of our picturesque state.

Tin Mill Brewery

Tin Mill Brewery

A welcome sign to the wine-ignorant in Wine Town

A welcome sign to the wine-ignorant in Wine Town

Wine isn’t really my thing. Expensive red wine is wasted on me. I’m good with Charles Shaw Cabernet Sauvignon for $3. But Hermann is home to dozens of wineries of varying quality, including what’s apparently the oldest family-owned winery in the US.

Side Note: While visiting the Adam Puchta Winery, someone ordered a Bud Light from the wine-by-the-glass booth. I’m no wine guy, but ordering a Bud Light at this place is the work of a truly remarkable dope. Even I had a glass of red wine. Bud Light is unacceptable anywhere, but particularly unacceptable here.

Back to the brewery…

Inside a hops refuge

Inside a hops refuge

A dozen and a half beers awaited us.

So many tap handles! None dispense wine!

So many tap handles! None dispense wine!

Beer flights are six 2 oz. samples for $8, so… an $8 beer.

Variety is wonderful

Variety is wonderful

The default flight includes 1, 3, 19, and 20. I chose 4 and 10 to round out my flight. Wifey chose 2 and 16.

Beer flights are a wonderful gift to mankind

Beer flights are a wonderful gift to mankind

My thoughts on these beers:

Skyscraper Pilsner – Light and airy with just a slight wheat flavor in the finish. If you were going to can one of these beers for some hefty yard work or to pull out of a cooler in a metal boat while fishing on a hot day, this is it. Quite refreshing and light. I could have gone for a heftier pilsner flavor, something a little less of a light beer. I got it later.

Red Caboose – Another solid red beer to shake my general dislike of red beers, which is now turning into more of a light malaise of red beers since I keep running into good ones. This is as good of a red beer as I’ve ever had. Not too dark. It’s flat and mild and envelops the tongue with a welcoming malty flavor. I enjoyed this quite a bit, but it’s something to have with a meal, not something to plow through in high numbers on a hot, humid day in a plastic chair in a chat biergarten in the Missouri River floodplain.

First Street Wheat – The only one of these beers that I’ve ever had before the flight. Robust orangy-amber color. It’s the most effervescent of the flight, with a hearty sour finish. I definitely don’t care for sour beers, but this had a nice zesty flavor that lingered after each sip. I got another afterwards. People like to drop lemon into their wheat beers – this one doesn’t need it at all.

Midnight Whistle – Smooth and rich with strong roasted malt flavor that gives hints of coffee and chocolate. It warmed and flattened quickly in the heat, bringing it down to the right temperature to enjoy the complex flavor profile. The toasty malt flavors dominated. The chocolate-caramel flavors would make this a great beer to sip down between bites of vanilla ice cream. Hell, you could probably make a float out of this.

Unfiltered Pils – My favorite of the flight! Better than the filtered Skyscraper Pils, in my opinion. These are the hoppy notes I was looking for, with a better finish and crispness than the filtered version. This beer carried a slightly deeper yellow color and stronger aroma. I also got a pint of this one after my flight, and then another pint the next day while buying my take home mix pack.

Summer Sun – Too bitter for my tastes, but a solid beer. When I think summer beer, I think Helles or Wheat. This was a little darker and hoppier than I’m used to for this seasonal beer. With a nice finish and a warm burnt orange color to complement the hoppy aroma, this beer will be loved by many – it’s just not quite my thing.

A world of wine awaits you outside.

A world of wine awaits you outside.

The next day, we boarded a massive trolley that rolled around town and surrounding areas to the various wineries. As the day progressed and the humidity rose, the winery trolley turned into the obnoxious drunken bachelorette party shitshow wagon, but we still powered through. If you ever find yourself in Hermann, either by design or against your will, swing by the Tin Mill Brewery for some craft beer in the middle of Missouri wine country.

By the way, Hermann, get your act together with these weak open container laws.!

WTF is this Soviet Russia?!

WTF is this Soviet Russia?!

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Brewers Being Bros: Stone Pale Ale

Stone Brewing Company makes some solid, tasty brews, but you probably already knew that. I’ve always been a fan of Arrogant Bastard and I’ve recently come to like Go To IPA, but their flagship beer had long been the Pale Ale.

Much to my surprise, Stone announced that they intended to discontinue their Pale Ale and replace it with Pale Ale 2.0. Uproar, or maybe some mild message board chatter, followed.

So what did the amazingly-cool Stone decide to do for the Pale Ale fans that would be missing their favorite beer? They published the entire recipe for the world to use, scaled back to five gallon batches. This wasn’t some half-assed recipe – they included the exact blend of hops and yeast and malt down to the hundredths of an ounce. Simply one of the coolest moves by any brewery ever.

With that background, I grabbed a sixer of the original Pale Ale and toasted to discontinuation.

Stone Pale Ale - Soon to be a rare sight

Stone Pale Ale – Soon to be a rare sight

Great smell, smooth pour that doesn’t leave a big head. Love the aroma of the malt and hops. Gorgeous color, though the formica backsplash belies the actual beer color. Idiot photographer…

Stone Pale Ale in a glass stein, with my formica countertop and wainscoting kitchen wall.

Stone Pale Ale in a glass stein, with my formica countertop and wainscoting kitchen wall.

As my beer sampling journey has progressed from PBR to knowing one style from another, I’ve become less of a hop head. This beer is right below the “too hoppy” threshold that would keep me from buying it again. Good hop flavor – the word here is balance. Quite smooth and not too bitter.

Not a session beer at 5.4 ABV but you aren’t getting ripped on these either of you are drinking them to enjoy them. I’m sad to see this beer go and also a little bummed that I discovered it late.

Definitely Drink This Beer while you can, but if you can’t… go support Stone by buying another one of their beers. Not every brewer would do a solid for their fan base by itemizing their beer recipe online, so give them a little love at the checkout line next time you’re looking for a couple sixers. Maybe make one a Stone.

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Smoked Chicken Bacon Cheesy Fajita Wrap

Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery.

A few weeks back, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported that SugarFire Smokehouse had placed in Memphis In May for some kind of smoked chicken bacon cheesy sushi dish. I gave it a shot a couple weeks ago on vacation as an appetizer for our fajita night, and we were met with rave reviews.

The wife told me to “take it easy” and “not go crazy” on the BBQ this 4th of July, so I made fresh salsa, grilled a bunch of gourmet sausages, and made the smoked chicken bacon cheesy fajita wrap for my extended family.

Step one is the bacon weave, this time a full pound of Tyson pork bacon (since it was on an insane sale of $2.99 for a 1 lb. pack), hosting at its center a pounded-flat boneless skinless chicken breast (this one being a little over 1o ounces).

Bacon weave and flattened chicken breast

Bacon weave and flattened chicken breast

On that went a washed, seeded, and thinly sliced Anaheim pepper, and a quarter of a sweet yellow (Vidalia) onion, cut into liberal long slices.

Peppers and onions round out a fajita

Peppers and onions round out a fajita

And on top of all THAT went some pulled mozzarella string cheese (two sticks) and a couple slices of pepper jack. I didn’t want too much heat, since a variety of people would be eating this – including a couple people who aren’t down with the hot peppers.

Cheesy does it

Cheesy does it

When wrapping this contraption, I pulled the bacon edges nearest to me into the center of the cheese slices and then rolled the whole thing forward. This may allow the cheese to slide around two sides of the bacon.

I didn’t bother closing up the edges since they went so far beyond the ends of the chicken and other contents.

Wrapped and ready for smoke

Wrapped and ready for smoke

My weave / wrap went onto a Weber 22″ set up for indirect smoking with large hickory chunks.

Time to drink some beers

Time to drink some beers

While this smoked, I drank some amazing beers that I muled back from Florida. That we can buy neither Oskar Blues nor Dogfish Head in St. Louis is ridiculous.

After 45 minutes, I rolled it over. After barely over an hour, it was fully smoked. Importantly, the digital temperature probe read well over 165 in all locations that I tested. It’s ready to rest.

OMG that looks nice

OMG that looks nice

After about 10 minutes of resting, I sliced it at an angle and rang the appetizer bell.

The middle pieces are nice, but the ends are excellent

The middle pieces are nice, but the ends are excellent

Cleaning up the scraps of smoked crispy bacon was hard work. I barely hat time to get pictures.

If you make this, here’s a tip: In addition to getting a center piece, make sure you also get one of the ends. It’s more bacony than cheesy, and it’s gluttonous.

The meats of my labor

The meats of my labor

Everyone who had it loved it, and I offer my sincere thanks to SugarFire for inspiring this slight variation on their idea. Make this – you’ll not regret it.

I hope you had a wonderful and save Independence Day, full of beers, meat, family, and fireworks.

Happy 4th from Webster Groves

Happy 4th from Webster Groves

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BBQ Joint Review (kind of): Busch Stadium

I spent my afternoon in a Busch Stadium party suite to watch my underachieving Cardinals earn a win over the pitiful Cubs.

A good vantage for complaining about balls and strikes

A good vantage for complaining about balls and strikes

Lunch was the best kind – paid for by someone else. Even better, it was bratwurst, hot dogs, and Busch Stadium’s BBQ brisket. The party room was big enough that there were two buffet lines. I hit up the first and snagged a brat and some brisket.

WTF happened here?

WTF happened here?

… or at least it was once brisket. The tongs struggled to grasp an appropriate amount of the stringy mess of beef. It wasn’t sliced at all – someone just shredded it whole, so there were long strands of meat randomly attached to other long strands of meat via fat and other sinew. I either got one strand of beef or a bird nest of beef. A frustrating buffet experience.

The string beef was not tender at all and had no smoke flavor or colors. Tough, dry beef does not make a good beer/baseball accompaniment. I was sad to report to a friend via text that this was inedible.

How was it made? My guess is someone over-baked it in an oven until they thought it was done and then beat it apart with a wooden spoon before pouring some pan drippings and BBQ sauce on top. Then the chef returned to his regular job of slicing potatoes silently in a dimly lit room under the stern gaze of Bill DeWitt III.

Chugging a Budweiser (also free) in an effort to forget the abomination beef, the guy next to me had a brisket sandwich. He raved, telling me all about how great it was. Rather than insult his malfunctioning palate for being impressed with shoe leather noodles, I just nodded at him. Sure thing, Buddy. He’s probably the same guy that votes for Olive Garden in the annual “best pasta” RFT diner survey.

Back inside, I got another free beer from the other side of the party suite and snagged a sub-par (but free) cookie. Glancing into the brisket tray on that side, something caught my eye…

How did I miss this?

How did I miss this?

More brisket, but (1) it’s sliced, and thinly at that, (2) it has pink smoke color on both sides of the slice, (3) it looks appetizing, and (4) I can recognize it as beef brisket. Can’t say that about the other tray.

How was it? Tender and tasty. No sinewy pull in the bites. It was flavorful and delicate and the sauce balanced well against the meat. Some non-incompetent person made this. An actual BBQ person. Amazing, considering the crud I’d just eaten on the other side of the party suite.

For the sake of comparison:

One good, one... not so good (or worse)

One good [right], one… not so good [left]

Something terrible happened in the BBQ kitchen at Busch. I hope that apprentice who made the fiasco was fired and sent back to whatever menial job he normally has. Sell felt pennants on Clark Avenue – just never touch the food intended for humans again. Clydesdales might even turn their gigantic noses up at that beef.

The well-made brisket was well made and I ate a bunch of it. If this was a restaurant, I’d probably get it again on a future trip. If you find yourself a guest in a party room at Busch, have a keen eye on BOTH buffet lines and don’t settle for bad brisket.

Stuffed Jalapeno Smoked Fatty

Spring is back in STL, which means I’m not grilling/smoking in snow or ice anymore.

On my list of BBQ dishes is the smoked fatty. Some Google searches will reveal that a fatty is a weave of bacon that’s wrapped around a meatloaf that’s stuffed with something. There are as many fatty recipes online as stars in the sky.

I like stuffed jalapenos, so…

Stuffed jalapenos

Stuffed jalapenos

… why not stick them in a fatty?

I took a 50/50 mix of pork salsiccia and ground chuck, plus an egg, totaling just under 2 lbs, and used 1/2 of it to make a boat atop my bacon weave. My stuffed peppers went into that boat.

Pork belly weave

Pork belly weave

Soon to be wrapped...

Stuffed peppers, stuffed in meat…

The boat was itself covered in the rest of the meat.

About to wrap

About to wrap

Once wrapped up, the whole thing was over three pounds. 1 lb. of pork sausage, 1 lb. of ground beef, 1 lb. of bacon, over half a brick of cream cheese (1/3 the fat!), and 5 veggies for health. This is not, uh, what’s the phrase… not good for you. But it’s hopefully yummy.

Maybe all the fat is why it's called a fatty?

Maybe all the fat is why it’s called a fatty?

 

Indirect heat in the Weber 22″ grill with a few hickory chunks.

Fatty fatty fat

Fatty fatty fat

After barely an hour, the bacon was nicely charred, so it got a 180 degree turn.

It's hard not to pick charred bacon chips off of this

It’s hard not to pick charred bacon chips off of this

After about 3 hours total, I pulled it and was ready to carve.

Fully smoked datty

Fully smoked fatty

A nice slice of fat(ty)

A nice slice of fat(ty)

I got a nice pink from the smoke and bacon, plus the meat stayed juicy from all the basting provided by the pork grease from the bacon. For my first effort, it wasn’t too bad. Probably just a little overdone, and maybe peppers and cream cheese wasn’t the best choice, but it was still pretty good. My picky son who likes some BBQ crushed it.

I’ll try another one soon… maybe mushroom and swiss? Philly cheese?

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BBQ Joint Review: The Salted Pig

Mid-morning I received an email from a friend that he wanted to try a new place called The Salted Pig and he wondered if I was game. Never heard of it, but he had me at “Salted Pig”.

Some Google searches revealed that this is the BBQ venture of Mike Del Pietro, who owns Sugo’s, which is my parents’ favorite pizza place in STL not owned by my uncle. That’s a strong resume.

Occupying the immediately-former Frontenac Grill site, a place better known as the former site of Coco’s (some breakfast place), The Salted Pig sits in a large out lot building at the corner of Lindbergh and Conway in the central STL county city of Frontenac, where stuff’s expensive. I waited tables in Frontenac for a few years and made bank. Big houses with gates and big retail sticker prices. So I planned to pay the municipality standard upcharge… the BBQ had better be worth it.

A welcome sign

A welcome sign

Quick anecdote that is relevant here: Some of us have noticed that when *ahem* larger people frequent restaurants, then the food is probably pretty good (the Sams Club cafe notwithstanding). For example, I once waited 20 minutes for some fried chicken at a local hotspot, but there were no fewer than 6x 400 lbs. people quietly, patiently, gleefully awaiting their carry out chicken. It occurred to me that the chicken is probably pretty damned good. Turns out it was really delicious.

Why is that relevant? My dining companion texted me from the parking lot (since he got there a few minutes ahead of me): “A big fat guy just walked out looking happy. That’s a good sign.”

Approaching the door, wafts of aroma from unseen smokers let us know we had probably made a good lunch decision.

Close up of the menu attachment mechanism

Close up of the menu attachment mechanism

The menus are single pieces of printed cardstock attached to a thin plank of stained wood via a pair of rubber bands. In fact, dark stained wood and earth tones dominate the decor of the restaurant, both inside and out. I quite enjoyed it.

From a bevy of appetizing options, I ordered the brisket chili, a half slab of baby back ribs, and a Sofie.

A complaint: My chili and entree arrived simultaneously. You’d think that the chili would have been an appetizer, or at least the waiter would have asked if I wanted it out first. Neither was the case, and I was handed a lot of food at once. Coursing is nice. Having to shift my ready-to-eat rib platter aside so that I can get going on my chili while it’s hot is not.

Mike got the pulled pork, which came on a bun (probably uselss) with fries. He wisely asked for an extra side of sauce.

Though not mine, an enviable plate of food

Though not mine, an enviable plate of food

The pulled pork plate looked simple enough. Minimalist generic fries, no pickles(!), and a heapin’ helpin’ of lightly sauced meat on a toasted bun.

My chili looked pretty good, deep red and chunky in a deep bowl atop a dishrag on a large plate with a single crouton.

Brisket chili

Brisket chili, w/ towel garnish

My ribs looked even better, paired with ceramic ramekins of beans and slaw. I’m psyched.

Yes, I'm that asshole who photographs his food at a restaurant

Yes, I’m that asshole who photographs his food at a restaurant

Pulled Pork:

Mike’s going to have a nice afternoon balancing the books at Frankenfoods, Inc. with a belly full of this pork. He slid me a few generous shreds in exchange for a rib and a chunk of brisket from my chili. I have to say it was pretty solid pulled pork. This piggy was not particularly salted, but the seasoning was restrained and well-balanced. As I suspected, the bun/bread was useless. In fact, it just soaked up valuable, valuable sauce.

On to this sauce… it reminded us both of a sauce I used to to make. Basically I would boil down a gallon of cider vinegar with oodles of seasonings and ingredients. Their sauce was vinegary, sweet, salty. It coated the meat perfectly and complemented the seasoning of the pork. Really a nice job with the sauce.

The feedback on the pork is that it’s impressive and filling and satisfying. I enjoyed my two big bites for sure.

Brisket Chili:

Chunky and flavorful. Large pieces of onion, loads of tender red beans, and huge chunks of hyper-tender brisket. Plenty of salt, but the spice is perfect. I swear I picked up on some green bell pepper flavors, but couldn’t find any pieces. It’s a great bowl of food. Everything is tender and velvety, with a nice presence in the mouth around the tongue. My only gripe with this chili (if I have to pick one) is that some of the beans were a little mealy instead of melty, but overall this was a really nice chili. Brisket is a solid chili ingredient, more so than pork in my opinion.

The crouton that came with the chili was apparently garnish not to be consumed. It didn’t taste like a typical crouton. This was clearly a slice of bread that accidentally went 80% stale and someone spritzed butter on it. I scooped some chili on the breadly wafer and took a bite and immediately regretted wasting chili on this greasy stale styrofoam display disguised as bread. It needed a silica gel warning – desiccant: do not consume.

Otherwise the chili was epic.

As amazing as the brisket chili was… I’m typing this review several hours later, and, well… I’ll let Coleman from Trading Places explain it.

"It gives me the wind, something terrible"

“It gives me the wind, something terrible”

Baby Back Pork Ribs:

Very tender with a nice smoke flavor. Some places put on too much rub before the smoke, or put on a bunch unnecessarily after the smoke, or the rub is too damned salty. None of the above here. What I liked about this rib was the tenderness. Nearly too tender, since there was very little pull back on the bite into the ribs, but the bite was better than anything I’ve ever made.

Great smoke color

Great smoke color

I’m not sure how they smoke these so that all the pink is on the convex side of the ribs, with a very deep ring.

What impresses me about these ribs is that the seasoning is modest and restrained, but done very well. The pork is respected during the cooking process to the point that the meat is the star, not the clever rub.

This shocked me: These ribs can hang with the top tier pork ribs in STL.

Sides: Beans and Slaw

The slaw was a solid cabbage and vinegar mixture with a generous portion of celery seed with paper thin slivers of carrot. It was just a tad oily, but really refreshing and a nice pairing with the ribs.

The beans were good, not great.  Lots of shredded meat in the beans, and it was a thick ramekin of beans. Not too spicy or salty, but pretty decent. The least impressive part of a great meal. Slightly above average beans. I didn’t come here for beans, though; I came out for salted pork.

The result was a clean plate.

Compliments to the chef; Apologies to the dishwasher

Compliments to the chef; Apologies to the dishwasher

The bottom line from this meal is that we were blown away in terms of reality vs. expectations.

I figured it was going to be another fancypants attempt at modern BBQ, which is a nice way of saying some idiot’s interpretation of pork and beef. No no no. This was a very impressive assortment of well-made, traditional BBQ. I’m happy to have gone, and we’re probably heading back on Friday with a friend from out of town (as in China) who wants to chow on some USA BBQ.

I recommend you give this place a shot. Frontenac or not, the price wasn’t outrageous, but the BBQ was top notch.

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Drink This Beer (While You Can): Schnucks Anniversary IPA

For a limited time, STL-area IPA fans can commemorate the 75th anniversary of one of the local grocery chain stores and also try another variation in the Schlafly IPA family. Having spent enough money at Schnucks in my lifetime to send at least one Schnuck kid to college for a year, what’s another 7 or 8 bucks for a sixer of Schnucks Anniversary IPA?

Didn't need a bag, so I got an orange sticker from the check out clerk

Didn’t need a bag, so I got an orange sticker from the check out clerk

I’m admittedly loyal to STL-based establishments to a fault, so this is a double homer beer. If only they could put a Cardinals logo on it and sell it exclusively at Ted Drewes.

Poured in a room temperature glass mug, it gives a highly effervescent cloudy yellow presentation with a thick though minimal head.

Drank this with the Cards game on the radio

Drank this with the Cards game on the radio

The hops aroma didn’t lie, with a 45 IBU. It’s a smooth, creamy hop flavor with grapefruit notes. In addition to the citrus, there’s some sweetness and a hint of pine (which maybe I’m only tasting because I read it on the beer label… confirmation bias). Smooth finish that leaves a lingering bitterness on the back sides of your tongue. Shared a few of these with my neighbor, who remarked that “these’ll go fast.” Indeed.

So if you are in the area and have the urge to try something hoppy that has limited availability, then you should Drink This Beer.

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Instant Beer Review: Schlafly Hop Trial UK Phoenix

Lenten beer battered cod fish sandwich with my father means sampling a beer you can only get on site at the Schlafly Bottleworks.

Lunchtime beer

Lunchtime beer

At 45 IBUs, this beer has nice restrained hop profile. The waiter said it had a floral finish, but I though it was nutty… borderline peanut buttery. Just delicious and refreshing.

Important details, neatly presented

Important details, neatly presented

Crisp, tasty, highly enjoyable. Drink This Beer, if you get the chance.

UPDATE

A friend who has a respectable beer palate said the following: Phoenix Hop Trial = 5/10. Too convoluted. Tastes like the leftovers of several other types of beers.

So take that for what it’s worth. Beer is subjective.

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